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4 Ways to Save Money, Extend Tooling Life and Get More from Your Tools

4 Ways to Save Money, Extend Tooling Life and Get More from Your Tools

Machine shops around the country are competing to take your business. So, what can you do to gain a competitive edge?

Your company’s profitability is directly related to its level of productivity and efficiency. While much of that is dependent on the efficacy of your employees and your processes, it’s important to remember that in the world of manufacturing, a worker is only as good as his or her tools. An idle machine becomes overhead when tooling components must be changed out due to early wear and tear or damage to the equipment itself.

Whether the tools of the trade include power tools, lathes or CNC machines, their effectiveness depends on proper usage and regular maintenance of cutting tools such as end mills, annular cutters and saw blades. If you’re experiencing premature tool failure, we have some tips on how you can save money by getting the most out of your tooling and machinery.

Related: The Guide to Choosing the Right Saw Blades for Optimum Productivity.

1. Maintain Your Tools and Equipment Regularly

Don’t wait until your tools require servicing to make repairs. Similarly, don’t rely on your advanced tooling to remind you to perform routine maintenance. Doing so leads to unnecessary downtime that can cost your company thousands, and oftentimes the servicing is performed too late. Instead, create a maintenance schedule that outlines change-out schedules, lubrication schedules or replacement timelines. Be sure to document these activities so that all employees, regardless of shift, know exactly where each tool or machine is on their maintenance schedule requirements. Additionally, these documents can identify recurrent machine failures or needs, helping you improve future machine and tooling reliability.
Check out these tips from industry leading cutting tools suppliers on getting more out of your cutting tools.

a. Stop band saw blade breakage
New band saw blades have razor sharp tooth tips. To withstand the cutting pressures used in band sawing and avoid microscopic damage, the tooth tip must be honed to a micro-fine radius. To avoid blade failure and get the most out of your new band saw blade, follow these blade break-in tips from Lenox Tools:

  • Choose the proper band speed for material to be cut
  • Reduce the feed rate/force control to 20-50% of normal cutting rate
  • Begin the first cut, and once teeth form a chip you can slightly increase feed rate
  • Make gradual increases in feed rate/force until normal cutting rate is established
  • If chatter or vibration occur, make slight adjustments
  • Once blade is broken in, feel free to use recommended band speed

b. Use tool reconditioning services
For getting more life out of your standard and special Carbide and PCD tooling, Guhring has an entire Reconditioning Division committed to bringing your cutting tools back to factory quality, condition and performance. They offer reconditioning services for drills, step drills, carbide end mills and reamers on both Guhring tools and competitor tooling.

c. Take advantage of cutter remanufacturer programs
The Slugger Cutter Remanufacturing Program through FEIN allows annular cutters to be sharpened up to 6 times (excludes Carbide cutters). Getting reground on the same CNC machines they were manufactured on ensures they are just as true and just as sharp as the day they were made. They also offer recoating services at an additional cost.

If you’re interested in saving money and want information on programs like these, reach out to your local M&M Sales & Equipment rep or call 800-592-4516.

2. Get Organized

One of the fastest ways to damage or lose frequently used tools and tooling components is by failing to return them to their proper place when not in use. How often have you heard the complaint, “I can’t find the grinding wheels” or “Has anyone ordered new drill bits? I’m all out.

Organizational problems like these are so common in industrial facilities that an entire lean management strategy has been developed to cut down on the time employees spend searching for items. 5S is a lean management process that increases productivity and transforms workplaces from one of disorder and clutter to one that is organized and efficient. The 5S methodology includes Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize, and Sustain. Set in Order is one of the 5S’s designated for organization. Some methods of Set in Order are simple and straightforward like labeling bins, shadow boards and peg boards for power tools, cutting tools, and accessories like grinding wheels and drill bits.

Other methods require a more strategic approach, such as industrial vending machines. Whatever method you choose, you can greatly reduce lost production time due to lost, missing or damaged tools. Another advantage to better organization is that you can keep a closer eye on the replacement parts you need to repair or service your tools and equipment.

3. Train Employees Regularly

Every facility has its own unique roadmap to optimum production, one that is guided by the CNC machinery and tooling needed to do the job. Cycle time, metal removal rates and material costs are just a few of the considerations that vary from one shop to another. That’s why it’s critical to train both new hires and veteran workers on your machines and your policies. Pay attention to areas that employees are struggling with, as well as recurrent tooling issues. Then, devise specialized training on those procedures. By educating your staff on the processes specific to your shop, you can help them do their jobs safer and more efficiently, while cutting down on unnecessary wear and tear on your equipment.

4. Say Goodbye to Outdated Tools and Machinery

As difficult as it may feel, retiring old and inefficient tooling and equipment is essential to your productivity and profitability. Regularly assess the performance and reliability of your equipment and tooling. Old or obsolete equipment should be swapped out for advanced versions that are more accurate, faster and more reliable, ultimately providing faster payback on your investment.

Related: What’s Machine Downtime Really Costing You?

By following these tips, you can not only get more life out of your tooling and equipment, but also increase production. According to an article in American Machinist, businesses spend about 80% of their time reacting to maintenance issues instead of preventing them. Consistently monitoring tooling and equipment usage, as well as keeping regular maintenance schedules can reduce unplanned downtime and lead to longer tool life. Which, as we all know, means bigger profit and less wasteful spending.

We’re always on the lookout for ways you can improve operations and increase your profitability. From cutting tools, abrasives and cutting fluid to safety and MRO supplies, we are your full line distributor. If you have questions on how M&M Sales & Equipment can help you, please call one of our four Texas locations.


Sandvik Coromant Spotlight: How to Get the Best Machining Result with Milling Cutters and Tools

Sandvik Coromant Spotlight: How to Get the Best Machining Result with Milling Cutters and Tools

Everything these days seems to be moving at lightning speed, with many folks thinking the quicker the better. From procurement to delivery, we want it done, and we want it done yesterday. However, when it comes to machining applications, these speed and feed rates can make or break the reliability of your milling cutters and cause damage to your expensive machines. Some of the top things to consider in tough and demanding milling operations are heat, vibration, stability, functionality and adequate metal and chip removal rates, as well as good process security.

That’s why it’s critical that you understand the fundamentals of the cutting tools and equipment you use daily. Without the right milling cutters, cutter bodies and cutting tool technology, those high speeds can not only slow or stop your shop’s productivity, but also eat away at your profits.

Fortunately, our partnership with the industry’s most innovative manufacturer in tooling technology, Sandvik Coromant, has provided us with helpful advice and tips to help you get the most out of your machining operation. Need answers right now? Call us directly at 800-592-4516.

Let’s begin by explaining the 7 basic features of your milling cutters:

The Shank is the cylindrical shaped part of the tool that is used to hold and locate it in the tool holder. It can be round and held by friction or held in place with a set screw.

The Flute of a milling bit are the deep helical grooves running up the cutter.

The Tooth is the sharp blade along the edge of the flute that cuts the material. The flute, with the help of the rotation of the cutter itself, helps to expel the material up and away from the cutting surface.

The Helix Angle describes the flutes of a milling cutter. Usually flutes are helical to allow gradual entry into the workpiece. If flutes were straight, they would enter the workpiece at the same time, causing vibration and potential damage. Tighter helix angles with higher rake angles often provide a better finish.

The Milling Cutter Materials are often high-speed steel (HSS) or carbide. As a rule of thumb, softer materials can be machined with HSS and harder materials require carbide. But note that while HSS is less expensive than carbide, it does wear out faster, requiring more frequent changeouts.

Coatings are helpful in improving the hardness of a cutting edge and to reduce friction on materials that have low thermal conductivity, or are unable to control heat-build up on both the milling cutter and the work piece.

The Tool Life of your milling cutter is critical. If you have high production and heavy workloads, it’s critical to invest in the right tooling that can keep up with the volume of work. Choosing inexpensive or inadequate tooling costs time and money on wasted material, scrap, wasted tool spend and added wear and tear on your machines.

It’s not enough to just choose the right milling cutter for the job. You also need to understand how the milling cutter, the workpiece, and the machine all work together to get the best machining results.

Understanding the ABCs of Milling Cutters and Milling Operations

The following is from Sandvik Coromant:

A. The Milling Cutter
Milling isn’t a one-size-fits-all operation. Milling cutters cover a wide range of traditional operations that remove metal from workpieces, but milling cutters can be also be used in alternative ways to produce holes, threads, cavities or pocketing. The features to be milled require careful consideration as milling cutters come in many shapes, sizes, coatings and cutting surfaces. Does the milling depth require extended tooling or does the feature to be milled contain interruptions or inclusions? These are common questions you should ask yourself.

B. The Workpiece
Consider the workpiece and its machinability. The size part to be milled is limited by the machine’s capabilities and depth of cut required. Additionally, the material’s characteristics will determine the overall functionality. Characteristics like hardness, thickness, rigidity, chemical resistance, heat treatability and thermal stability all play a critical role, so special attention must be paid to choosing dedicated tooling and milling strategies.

C. The Machine
The milling method you choose will impact the type of machine you need. Typically, there are two configurations, vertical milling machines and horizontal milling machines. There are multitasking machines (MTM) that can handle a variety of operations including milling and lathing, but there are limitations. Choosing the right machine for the job will save you money on equipment repair and replacement, as well as saving on scrap costs.

Related: Improve Your Machine Shop’s Burden Rate

We’ve been partnering with Sandvik Coromant in Odessa, Lubbock, Amarillo and Fort Worth, Texas, for years. M&M Sales & Equipment proudly offers the entire line of Sandvik Coromant Milling Tools, including: 

  • Shoulder Milling Tools
  • End Milling Tools
  • Face Milling Tools
  • Profile Milling Tools
  • Disc Milling Tools
  • Groove Milling Tools
  • Thread Milling Tools
  • Chamfer Milling Tools

M&M Sales & Equipment is your cutting tool specialist and we’re proud to be a Gold Tier Sandvik Coromant distributor. For more information on these and other milling cutters, tools and accessories available through M&M Sales & Equipment, stop into one of our four convenient Texas locations or give us a call at 800-592-4516.


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Discover Jet-Stream­™ Turning, Boring and Threading Tool Solutions from Dorian Tool

Discover Jet-Stream­™ Turning, Boring and Threading Tool Solutions from Dorian Tool

You may think you know Dorian Tool for their line of cost-effective and reliable metal cutting tools, but there’s an entire side of them you may have never seen.

Since their Quadra Index Tool Post hit the scene in 1982, Dorian Tool has been innovating and exploring new technologies designed to help you improve quality and productivity in your precision machine shop. Today, they offer a wide selection of tools for both manual and CNC machines that include:

  • Carbide inserts
  • Toolholders
  • Knurling tools
  • Marking tools
  • Machine tool accessories
  • Rotary setters
  • Tool setters

Over the last several years, Dorian Tool has doubled down in research and development to come up with innovative new ways to improve their tooling options for the metalworking world.

Meet the Jet-Stream™ Thru Coolant System from Dorian Tools

Looking for a better CNC machine coolant option? For better surface finish, work quality and tolerance, the Jet-Stream™ Thru Coolant System turning, boring and threading tools have coolant exits, one above the insert cutting edge and one below. Having two exit points for coolant to be injected helps to reduce friction on the cutting edge and keep temperature constant, rather than spiking up and down. This offers better edge wear, reduces insert chipping and results in higher speeds and feeds. They’re available in a variety of options which include:

  • Jet-Stream™ Thru Coolant Turning and Boring
  • Jet-Stream™ Thru Coolant, API, Grooving
  • Jet-Stream™ Thru Coolant Hardware and Inserts

A Lesson in the Double Jet Coolant System from Dorian Tool

Source: Dorian Tool

Check out this video from Dorian Tool to see how it works!

Why Temperature Can be Detrimental to Machining Processes

Any time you activate a cutting tool on metal, you generate heat. If that heat isn’t carefully controlled and begins to accumulate, the cutting surface can become deformed and damaged. Damaged workpieces then become expensive scrap.

Related: 5 Ways to Reduce Scrap in Your Metal Cutting Operations

CNC machine coolants are used to bring down the temperature at the point of contact. High pressure cooling like that offered by Dorian Tool’s Jet-Stream™ tooling is introduced at the exact point of contact to remove heat at high rates and pressures, eliminating the vapor barrier common with standard coolant systems. That barrier typically blocks standard low-pressure coolant, limits the amount of lubrication to the cutting edge and actually causes chips to fall back into the tool. That’s why standard coolant systems often result in damage to the workpiece or lead to an inferior finished product.

Learn why Dorian Tool may be the best choice for your machining operations. Talk to your local rep today!

From cutting tools, abrasives and cutting fluid to safety and MRO supplies, we are your full-line distributor. If you have questions or need help on your machining processes, we are just a phone call away. Whether you’re a machine shop in Odessa, Lubbock, Amarillo, Fort Worth or surrounding areas, M&M Sales & Equipment has four convenient Texas locations to serve you. Give us a call and we’ll get you the assistance you need with a specific product, application or order inquiry today.

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Score Big on JET® Metalworking Saws with our March 2020 Promotion

We are excited to extend some big-time savings to you on the metalworking saws you depend on for precision cutting results. From bandsaws to cold saws and more, we can get you the metalworking saws you need.

From now until March 29, 2020, save on metalworking saws from the industry leader JET®. Save up to 10% on select saws:

  • JET® 5″ X 6″ MITERING HORIZONTAL BANDSAWS
  • JET® 5″ X 6″ MITERING VARIABLE SPEED HORIZONTAL BANDSAW
  • JET® 5″ X 6″ VARIABLE SPEED HORIZONTAL VERTICAL BANDSAW
  • JET® 5″ X 6″ HORIZONTAL VERTICAL BANDSAWS
  • JET® 7″ X 10-1/2″ MITERING HORIZONTAL BANDSAWS
  • JET® 7″ X 12″ HORIZONTAL/VERTICAL BANDSAW WITH COOLANT SYSTEM
  • JET® 7″ X 12″ HORIZONTAL/VERTICAL BANDSAW WITH COOLANT SYSTEM
  • JET® 14″ & 18″ VERTICAL METAL/WOOD BANDSAW
  • JET® 12″ (315mm) MANUAL FERROUS COLD SAWS
  • JET® 10″ (275mm) MANUAL FERROUS COLD SAWS

Watch JET in action now!

Don’t miss out on these limited time savings! Promotion ends March 29, 2020. Talk to your local M&M Sales & Equipment representative today!

Lessons in Commonly Used Commercial Valves from Apollo Valves

A valve is a valve, right? That may be true to the rest of the world, but out here valves are as complicated as they are necessary. The ordinary person probably doesn’t know there’s a different valve for almost every need, and choosing the right valve can quickly become confusing in an industrial setting. Valves can be categorized in several ways, including how they operate, how they function, and in which applications they are to be used.

Fortunately, we have some helpful tips on understanding the six main types of valves from industry-leading valve manufacturer, Apollo Valves.

We’ve been partnering with Apollo Valves in Odessa, Lubbock, Amarillo and Ft. Worth, Texas, for many years. You may be familiar with Conbraco Industries, leading manufacturer of American Made flow control products. Today, they are housed under the Apollo name and together blaze the trail to create the innovative products that drive American industry, one valve at a time.

Understanding 6 Types of Valves and their Applications

  1. Gate Valves
    Industrial and residential piping applications, as well as sewage pipes and water distribution pipe systems commonly use gate valves because they have the capability for more substance flow and lower pressure drops within the valve. The new Apollo International™ cast iron gate, globe and check valves provide full flow capabilities.

  2. Ball Valves
    Otherwise known as quarter-turn operation valves, ball valves are designed with a spherical ball with a hole that goes through it. When the valve is open, the substance passes through. When the valve is closed, the hole becomes perpendicular to the opening and stops flow. The Apollo® 70 Series is the most widely used and trusted bronze ball valve in the industry.

  3. Butterfly Valves
    Butterfly valves are similar to ball valves in that they are also quarter-turn operation valves, but have a butterfly disc that allows the substance to flow aerodynamically around it. They are ideal for regulating flow and can handle thicker slurries or suspended solids because there are no open cavities where particles can settle. The large diameter Apollo International™ LD141 Series Ductile Iron Butterfly Valves are ideal for use in Industrial and Commercial/HVAC/Mechanical applications.

  4. Globe Valves
    When you need to control the flow of fluids that are more viscous in nature such as oil, globe valves are often your best bet. They can control both on and off operations, as well as flow rate control. Just remember that the S-shaped nature of the passageway often leads to more high pressure drops than other valves.

  5. Needle Valves
    For fine adjustments in regulation and control of flow rate, needle valves use their tapered, needle-like valve stem to act as a control mechanism. They are often used in pressure pump governors, automatic combustion systems and instrumentation controls. The Apollo® 60A Series Steel & Stainless Steel Barstock Globe Valves are ideally suited for use in instrumentation, sampling lines and flow control applications.

  6. Check Valves
    What is a check valve? Check valves are used to prevent backflow in piping systems and activated by the pressures of what is running through the system. When fluid flows in a certain direction, the value opens; but if the fluid were to reverse direction, the valve would close.

View the Apollo’s Commercial Product Lineup here.

Match the Valve Type to the Function It Performs 

If you’re looking to get the most out your equipment (and who isn’t?), there’s three things you need to know when choosing a valve. First, you need to match the valve type to the function it performs. Not doing so will lead to leaks, damage and subprime performance.

Second, you must evaluate the material flowing through the valve. What temperature is the material? What is the pressure? Is the valve in an open or closed position? Do you need a shut-off valve or regulator?

Lastly, consider the pipe size, operating flow and piping material and match it to the valve that not only fits, but performs. For instance, the size of a copper pipe is different than a PVC pipe. An adapter may be required if you want to use a copper valve on a PVC pipe rather than a PVC valve.

Have more questions about selecting the right valves for your needs? M&M Sales & Equipment is here to help in West Texas, with locations in Odessa, Amarillo, Lubbock and Ft. Worth. Reach out to our knowledgeable sales representatives and they’ll be happy to discuss your needs and help you find the best solution. Contact us online, by phone or stop in and say hello.


New Product Alert: TRIM® E923 Metalworking Fluid from Master Fluid Solutions®

If you’ve been following us for a while, you would know we are always talking about how to get the most out of your metal cutting operations. We’re big on efficiency and maximizing productivity. Maybe it’s because we’ve been in your shoes. Many of our own team members have worked in the metal cutting industry and that experience drives us to find solutions that helps you operate at peak performance.

So, when we came across a new product from Master Fluid Solutions® we knew our friends in the automotive, energy sectors and the manufacturing industry at large needed to know about it. The TRIM® E923 is their proprietary blend of new vegetable-based technology and very high levels of chlorine-free extreme-pressure (EP) additives.

Earlier this year, UK-based publisher, Manufacturing Machinery World, ran an article about the release of TRIM® E923, No Compromise Coolant For The Toughest Of Applications. In it, they said that TRIM® E923 is in a class of its own as a complete coolant package for harsh applications.

What’s so great about it? It’s designed to extend tool life in your most difficult metal cutting operations like Inconel®, titanium and high-tensile-strength steel. TRIM® E923  is designed especially for applications such as boring, broaching, deep-hole drilling, down the hole work, drilling, heavy-duty machining center work, screw machine operations and much more. Plus, it offers extreme lubricity for clean and accurate cuts without the need for costly additives.

TRIM® E923 helps in the following ways:

  • Delivers exceptional lubricity and EP performance
  • Has the necessary performance to replace neat oils in certain applications
  • Very long sump life
  • Low foam even in soft water areas
  • Hard water tolerant
  • Compatible with all materials excluding magnesium
  • Easily recycled or disposed of without special handling or equipment
  • Will run effectively for long periods without the need for costly additives

Learn more about TRIM® E923 from Master Fluid Solutions.

Have questions on this new product from Master Fluid Solutions®? The team at M&M Sales & Equipment would love to help you find the solutions you need to work more efficiency and profitability in your facility. Contact us, give us a call or stop in.

The Guide to Choosing the Right Saw Blades for Optimum Productivity

Choosing the right saw blade is critical to a manufacturing facility or machine shop’s profitability and productivity. Not doing so can lead to shorter blade life or complete blade failure diminishing any potential for efficiency. So, we created a handy guide that can help break down the terminology surrounding saw blade selection, as well as provide tips on extending blade life and how to properly break in your new blade. Whether you are sawing large workpieces or difficult to cut materials, knowing your blade can mean the difference between making money or losing it.

Common Saw Blades

Source: Lenox Tools

Circular Saw Blades: For use with miter saws, table saws, radial arm saws, cut-off saws and standard circular saws, these blades come in a variety of materials that can cut metal, wood, cement, glass or laminates. We sell a variety of metal circular saw blades from names like Lenox, Fein and Evolution! Be sure to ask about our Fiber cut-off wheels from Pferd and United Abrasives/SAIT.

Carbide Tipped Band Saw Blades: Designed to cut composites, metal and wood. High-performance steel and optimized carbide grades cut faster and last longer in a wide variety of sawing applications. For band saw blades, we offer a wide selection of blades from Lenox, Starrett and Arntz.

Bi-Metal Band Saw Blades: Bi-metal band saw blades are among the most versatile choice for most metal sawing applications involving a wide variety of materials such as aluminum and non-ferrous metals, carbon and structural steel. They’re cost effective, perform well and have long blade life with high-speed tooth tips and flexible alloy steel back.

Carbon Band Saw Blades: Economical and reliable, carbon band saw blades are great for general purpose and utility sawing. They are used to cut a variety of materials from carbon steels and aluminum to abrasive materials such as wood and fiberglass. Ideal for small maintenance and light-production shops.

Reciprocating Saw Blades: Whether it’s tile, clay, wood, cast iron, bricks or metals there’s a reciprocating saw blade for the job. Reciprocating saws are versatile in that you can swap out different blades for different materials. Ideal for maintenance, demo or repair applications.

Cold Saw Blades: High-speed steel cold saw blades are often used for cutting pipes, tubes and other solid steel materials. Many types of cold saw blades can be re-sharpened and used several times before replacing. The name comes from the transfer of heat energy during the cutting process. The blade and work material stay cold and the heat is expelled in the chip.

Grit Edge Saw Blades: Carbide Grit Edge Blades offer a seamless cut into abrasive and hardened materials, fiberglass, steel belted radial tires and other composites.

Hole Saws: Hole saw blades cut clean and accurate holes in a variety of materials from metals, woods or plastics.

Annular Cutters: Similar to a hole saw but runs in a magnetic drill. We offer a variety of premium annular cutters from FEIN.

Did you know? M&M Sales & Equipment can weld ¼-inch to 1 ½ inch wide saw blade material to any length on site; we also have the most popular lengths in stock from our supplier partners.

Understanding the Parts of Your Saw Blade

The Gullet is the space between each saw tooth that allows for efficient chip removal. The larger the material or the faster the feed rate, the deeper the gullet (such as in a 2/3 variable tooth blade that has a much bigger gullet than an 8/12 variable tooth’s gullet) and the more chips that are expelled.

Tooth Construction is another critical part of how your saw blades are made. Different tooth constructions offer different advantages. For instance, a carbide tipped tooth offers a longer lasting and smoother cutting blade.

Tooth Form refers to the shape of the tooth. The shape impacts how a blade cuts through material and can extend blade life, control noise level and provide a smoother cut and chip capacity.

  • Variable Positive shape offers variable tooth spacing and gullet capacity for less noise and vibration, while simultaneously allowing for faster cuts, longer blade life and smoother cuts.
  • Variable shape is similar to Variable Positive, but can be used for slower cutting rates.
  • Standard is a good multipurpose shape that can be used in many various applications.
  • Skip shape has a wide gullet ideal for non-metallic applications.
  • Hook shape is similar to the Skip, but can be used on metal and non-metal applications.

Tooth Set refers to the number of teeth and the angle that they are offset. Different tooth sets impact cutting efficiency and chip carrying ability. For a clear visual on how tooth set can differ, refer to this guide from Lenox Tools.

Kerf Width is the width of the cut made by the blade into the desired material. Full kerf blades remove about 1/8” of material, while thin kerfs generally remove about 3/32” of material. Because the full kerf removes more material, it’s best to use with a more powerful saw. Thin kerf blades can be used with saws that use less horsepower.

Other consumables that can help or hinder cutting conditions are choices of hydraulic oil and cutting fluids. But it always comes down to blade selection. Choosing a better crafted blade designed for an application results in better wear and heat-resistance, fewer changeouts, better accuracy and less waste.

Learn more about blade maintenance in “How Do I Choose the Right Saw Blade for My Project? 

To avoid blade failure and get the most out of your new saw blade, remember these blade break-in tips:

  1. Choose the proper band speed for material to be cut.
  2. Set the beginning band feed rate at 50% of normal/recommended feed rate.
  3. Begin the first cut and once 50-70 in2  of material has been cut, gradually increase feed rate to normal.
  4. If chatter/noise occurs, adjust cutting speed.

To learn more about the different types and brands of saw blades we offer, reach out to M&M Sales & Equipment representatives or stop in at one of our four locations in Texas.

Aerospace Alert: Run Longer and Cleaner with New TRIM® C390 Coolant

The aerospace industry comes with strict requirements when it comes to the use of lubricants, and for good reason. We’re talking about lubricants used in machining components for expensive machinery, often carrying valuable cargo. The industry demands high-performance, lightweight and dependable lubricants that can ensure the highest level of performance and safety in your operations.

The latest solution is here and it’s good. The new TRIM® C390 High Performance Aerospace Synthetic is designed for the machining of composites for global aerospace industries. With a name like Master Fluid Solutions, you know this synthetic coolant has been designed specifically to offer both cooling and lubricity, without all the oily residue common in other synthetics.

TRIM ® C390 can improve your machining operations through:

  • Resisting corrosion on ferrous and nonferrous materials
  • A low-foaming formula even in chilled environments up to 60° F
  • Meeting nuclear and aerospace chemical content and machining requirements
  • Performing in wide range of operations including general grinding, spar milling and turbine blade manufacture
  • Providing low carryoff and long sump life
  • Easy cleanup and removal for decreased operating costs

Learn more about TRIM C390 from Master Fluid Solutions.

Watch this video from Master Fluid Solutions to learn how to extend your coolant life:

The team here at M&M Sales & Equipment would be happy to speak with you and uncover all the ways we can help you improve and maximize operations in your facility. Contact us, give us a call or stop in.


Save on Sandvik Coromant Cutter Bodies with Purchase of New Steel Milling Grades, Sept. 9-20

Manufacturers and fabricators know all too well the challenges of working with hard and abrasive steel, especially when working at high speeds or for extended periods of time. The cost of wear and tear on cutting inserts can be high, whether it’s due to unstable conditions, wet conditions or heat changes. Frequent use results in cracks, breaks and wear.

Sandvik Coromant recently released their new steel milling grades designed to boost steel milling operations. They launched the GC1130, the GC4330 and the GC4340 with the goal of increasing tool life and process security over the previous generations.

The GC4330 and GC4340 are both made with advanced technologies and a new substrate coating called Inveio™ which increases wear resistance, without impacting security. And the hard, thin-coated PVD grade GC1130 with Zertivo™ technology is ideal for light roughing to finishing operations and this steel milling insert provides superior performance in all machining conditions.

M&M Sales & Equipment is extending special manufacturer savings directly to you, but only for a limited time. The deal runs from Sept. 9-20, 2019.


Receive 50% off the regular list price on cutter bodies when purchased with new steel milling grades. *


Deal applies to milling cutter bodies including:

CoroMill® 390
Versatile concept suitable for mixed production
For mixed production with a variety of component features and materials, this is your go-to cutter. With an assortment including many different types of tools and wide selection of corner radii and insert sizes for various depth requirements.

CoroMill® 490
First choice for general and repeated shoulder milling
Light-cutting, positive concept with four cutting edges. Precise cutter bodies and insert location along with low-vibration machining process provide accurate shoulders without mismatch. Covers roughing to finishing.

CoroMill® 210
Productive roughing concept for high-feed face and plunge milling
First choice when high metal removal rate is the first priority. A 10° entering angle allows for extreme feed rates when face milling. This directs the cutting forces in an axial direction, providing a stable cutting action and no vibration tendency.

CoroMill® 745/725
Multi-edge cutters for best production economy
Offers multi-edge, double-sided insers with the cutting performance of a positive single-sided concept. Available also with a 25° entering angle as a productivity booster in CoroMill® 725.


And the following:

  • CoroMill® 200 – Robust face milling and profile cutter
  • CoroMill® 245 – General purpose cutter
  • CoroMill® 345 – First choice for highly productive face milling
  • CoroMill® 415 – Small diameter, high feed face milling cutter
  • CoroMill® 419 – Five-edged milling concept


View the family of Milling Cutters including High Feed Milling, Face Milling, Shoulder Milling and Profile Milling.


Contact your M&M Sales & Equipment representative to learn how you can take advantage of special pricing direct from the manufacturer. Just don’t wait too long, because the special deals end Sept. 20, 2019. If you have any questions or need help selecting the tools and supplies right for your job, don’t hesitate to contact us by clicking here.

Or, give us a call at your preferred branch location:

*Discount with qualifying insert order with cutter bodies only. Must purchase 10 inserts per inch (25 mm) to receive cutter blitz discount pricing. No returns, all sales are final. Offer is valid from September 9-20th, 2019.


How to Choose the Right Drill Bit for Your Application

Drill bits. One of the most useful and versatile tools that exist. You may be surprised to know that using the wrong one can not only hinder production, but could be costing more than you may think. That’s why it’s important to choose drill bits that are optimized for the application. Otherwise, you’re likely to be replacing the bits and the tools too often. Not only that, but you risk damaging the workpiece and having to start over.

Machinists and fabricators use drills daily, and proper drill bit selection can save both time and money. If you are looking to get the best machining result, here are some things to consider when choosing a drill bit for your next project.

Choosing the Right Drill Bit for the Job

Morse Cutting Tools – HSS

There are countless drill bits on the market today, making selection both difficult and time consuming. Two main categories of drill bits include standard bits used with handheld drills or drill presses and boring machine bits that are used in automated machinery like drill banks and CNC machines. Here are some brief explanations of various types of drill bits.

Twist Drill bits are the most common and can be used in a variety of everyday tasks from drilling woods, metal and plastic. They are made from High-Speed Steel or Carbon Steel.

Counterbore bits create a flat bottom blind hole with a smaller diameter center hole. These are often used to create a recess that can hide a fastener head.

Countersink bits create a tapered surface hole with a smaller center hole to allow fastener to sit flush with the material.

Flat Bottom Boring bits are similar to counterbores, but do not have a center drill.

Specialty bits are essentially all bits that don’t fit into the above categories and can be used with glass, tile or other specialty materials.

Coolant Through Drills have coolant ports that run through the drill and feed coolant to the cutting edge, allowing for faster cutting and improved chip evacuation. Used in high performance drilling operations.

Exchangeable Tip Drills have replaceable carbide heads or tips that saves time when changing tools and saves money over larger solid carbide drills. They also boost productivity in many machining applications.

Spade Drills have spade inserts that allow for cost effective drilling of deep holes and large diameter holes. They also run well on older machines and at lower speeds than high performance carbide drills.

Inserted Drills have multiple carbide inserts that handle the metal cutting. They are faster than HSS and cobalt drills, are cost effective and many can be used to “turn” the hole to a larger diameter than the drill size, much like using a boring bar in a lathe.

Understanding Drill Bit Materials

Drillco Drills

Certain tooling and machining operations require specialized drill bits that allow for effective drilling, without burning out too quickly.  Below, you’ll find some common drill bit materials and their uses.

Cobalt (HSCO): Despite being more brittle than HSS, cobalt drill bits are ideal for drilling harder steel as well as stainless steel grades. They are often more expensive than other drill bits but tend to last longer.

Carbide (Carb): Carbide is considered the hardest and most brittle drill bit material and can cut hardened steel, stainless steel and aluminum with ease. Ask if the CoroDrill 860 from Sandvik Coromant is right for you.

Diamond: These bits are effective for drilling tile, stone or other hard material and the use of water is recommended to prevent damage to the workpiece or tool. These are costly, so they are recommended for use in very specific tasks.

High-Speed Steel (HSS): High-Speed Steel bits are harder, more resistant to heat and can drill metal at greater cutting speeds than high-carbon steel. Ask about our HSS drills from Morse or Drillco that are available in a variety of lengths, including jobber and stub/screw.  

How Flute Design Impacts Cut

Flutes are grooves that are cut into the body of the drill bits to provide cutting surfaces, permit removal of chips and allow cutting fluids to reach cutting surfaces. There are different variations of flutes, but here are some common ones you should know.

Standard: Standard flutes are the most common and have a circular cross section.

Parabolic Design: This refers to the open geometry and faster spiral of a twist drill bit. It offers improved chip evacuation, increased feed rate, shorter cycle times and reduces the need for a peck cycle. It’s also less likely to jam and break.

Straight Flute: Used when drill rigidity is more important than chip evacuation, especially in short chipping materials. Also, can be used when the workpiece is spinning instead of the drill itself.

Source: CNC Cookbook

Drill Point Coatings Explained

Coatings reduce friction when drilling. That reduction of heat helps to protect the drill bit and improves the flow of material out of the hole. See below for a brief explanation of various drill point coatings.

Black Oxide is a black surface coating that improves heat resistance, reduces friction and increases chip flow.

Bronze Oxide coatings help to increase tempering and relieves stress on the bit.

Bright drill points do not have a coating, but they are polished for increased chip flow and can be used in plastics, woods and aluminum.

Titanium Nitride (TiN) coatings help drills run faster and increases tool life because it increases the hardness of the bit. Look for drill points to be gold in color.

Titanium Carbonitride (TiCN) is ideal for stainless steel, cast iron and aluminum as it is harder and more wear-resistant than other coatings. Look for drill points to be a blue-gray in color.

Titanium Aluminum Nitride (TiALN) is ideal for use in high-alloy carbon steels, nickel-based materials and titanium, but should not be used for drilling aluminum. Look for drill point color to be violet.

“Man must shape his tools lest they shape him.”

Choosing the wrong tools can impact your productivity and profitability. With so many options out there, choosing the right cutting tools can be overwhelming — but it doesn’t have to be. We take pride in the level of knowledge and experience the M&M Sales & Equipment team has to offer our customers.

If you’re looking to improve production in your facility, but don’t know where to start, give us a call or stop in at one of our four locations. We offer a variety of quality drills from top-rated brands like Drillco, Morse, Guhring and Sandvik Coromant. Whatever your production needs are, M&M Sales & Equipment can help you get it done. Contact us today.